Sunday, August 3, 2014

New Pads

It was perfect weather for riding today, but instead I did some maintenance to my bike, like that was as much fun as riding. Still in doing the service on my bike gives me a certain level of satisfaction that I know that the bike will be in good order for riding. I cast a careful eye over everything today. I'd been down to MCAS on Saturday and bought a few goodies for the bike ready for Sunday's servicing. With a little know how you can save yourself hundreds by doing things yourself.



I'd replaced the front brake pads with a set of DP brake pads.The old pads had less than the recommended 2mm of pad thickness. It looked closer to about 1mm. I also flushed the front and back lines with fresh Motul brake fluid. It had been over 2 years since I'd done this. The fluid that came out was definitely darker in colour than the new stuff. It only took 15 minutes to bleed all 3 lines.

I'd also done an oil and filter change and exceeded my expectations by not getting a single drop of oil on the garage floor, I've never been able to change it without getting some oil on the floor, that's the first time in 9 years of  living here and servicing my bike that's happened. I was pretty chuffed with myself.

I'd also cleaned out the radiator, which looks pretty badly damaged from stones. I think I'm going to have to get a new/second hand one. After that I'd degreased around the front sprocket area, chain rear sprocket and wheel. Then it was a quick wash then a polish. I'd removed about 1/2 kg of rocks and grease from the belly pan when I had it off.
Here she is in full service mode


I'd also bought a set of 90° valve stems for the wheels of my bike. I've become that pissed of with the shit compressor fittings that you get at service stations when you go to fill your tyre with air, most of them you can't get the F'ing fitting inside the wheels with the discs and spokes in the way. Frustrating to say the least. These should sort that out, but will have to get them fitted later when I'm getting my tyre changed.



Of course all of this work was overseen by my supervisor who decided she would check out my workmanship. I think I got the wink of approval.


13 comments:

  1. As I was reading I was wondering if you had a wee supervisor or two. Cute picture - she is so adorable.

    Sounds like you are race ready for when that next perfect riding day comes along.

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    1. At one point I think she was going to fire me but it all worked out in the end :)

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  2. Good job.
    Did you not get oil on the floor because there was no oil left in the sump....?
    You need to get your shock rebuilt and change the fork oil as well and it will be like new, rather than wasting thousands on a newer model.

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    1. There's always one smart ass, no there was oil in there, maybe I just fluked it.
      The amount of money required spending will be more than the bike is worth?

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    2. Is the fork oil original?

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    3. Nope, I replaced it in 2009 and can't remember if its been done since. Time for replacement, and a rear shock rebuild.

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  3. Quality time in the shed - second only to getting out on the bike...

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    Replies
    1. You know what, it was quality time. I really enjoyed it.

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  4. Chiller, great photo of the little one.

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  5. Steve, your comment about DIY saving money is certainly the case. I can do an oil & filter change for around $90 all up. The same thing when called a 'handbook service' at my mechanic or a dealership costs around $350. The fairing doesn't even have to come off. The benefit of a warranty that requires a qualified mechanic to do things is pretty questionable.

    Similarly, I was quoted $150 to $220 to install the heated grips. I did them with a mate, and neither of us had done them before, in under two hours and the slowest bit was getting at the battery (right side of fairing& a real fiddle to access).

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    1. Mate with a little know how I've saved heaps. I'm sure I probably saved about $400 doing this stuff myself, plus I know it was done right. My mate took his bike to a big dealer here in Sydney and got a new set of tyres. Before leaving he found that the front tyre was installed with the direction arrow in the wrong way. The head mechanic laid the blame on an apprentice. Well that's shameful in my opinion as it should be checked before going out by either a fully qualified tradesman or head mechanic, not just dribble out excuses. Thats a shocking display from a bike shop and if my mate hadn't checked he could have been killed by that tyre coming apart at speed on the road because they fitted it wrong.

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  6. hey there chillertek
    i use these for the tyre valve problem with garages
    just put 1 in my coat and carry one on the bike for when needed
    90 degree valve extension
    http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/PAIR-MOTORCYCLE-MOTORBIKE-TYRE-VALVE-EXTENSION-ADAPTOR-90-DEGREE-ANGLE-CAR-BIKE-/191183028102?_trksid=p2054897.l4275

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